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Join the Friends of the Owens-Thomas House

An active Telfair Museums Membership is required for eligibility to join/renew our Member Groups.

Select your level below to join or renew your FOT membership:

$100 Individual »

$150 Dual »

$250 Richard Richardson »

$500 George W. Owens »

$1,000 Margaret Gray Thomas »

The Friends of the Owens-Thomas House, or FOT, is a group of Telfair Museums members especially interested in architecture, decorative arts, and history. Their contributions support continued preservation and interpretation efforts at the Owens-Thomas House & Slave Quarters, public programming, and emerging scholarship. Members enjoy special access to tours and lectures, invitations to events like the annual Champagne Garden Party, and exclusive visits to museums, historic homes, and private collections.

FOT Research Fellowship

To further its commitment to expanding scholarship on decorative arts and architecture in the American South, the Friends of the Owens-Thomas House are offering a Research Fellowship to support graduate students (current MA or PhD students) and emerging scholars (those having earned a graduate degree within the last five years) in the field. Awards of up to $2,500 may be used to support travel to conduct research, attend institutes or conferences in the 2024 calendar year, or ease publication costs. Interested applicants should direct their questions or submit a project description (maximum 500 words), budget, and CV to Dr. Elyse D. Gerstenecker, Curator of Decorative Arts, at gersteneckere@telfair.org. Letters of recommendation also are welcomed, but not required. Application deadline is January 31, 2024.

Upcoming Events

Join us for these exciting FOT events!

FOT Presents: Jennifer Van Horn

May 30 at 5:30pm7pm Jepson Center
In conjunction with the exhibition Shattered Illusions: Reconsidering Glassware through the Lens of Care, Friends of the Owens-Thomas House (FOT) welcomes art historian Dr. Jennifer Van Horn of the University of Delaware to speak about the relationship of objects, artwork, and enslavement in the United States.

Masculine Mentalities with Dr. Sandy Slater

The Friends of the Owens-Thomas House (FOT) is proud to present a fascinating lecture on masculinity in the low country during the early 19th century with Dr. Sandy Slater.
Play Video

Masculine Mentalities with Dr. Sandy Slater

The Friends of the Owens-Thomas House (FOT) is proud to present a fascinating lecture on masculinity in the low country during the early 19th century with Dr. Sandy Slater.

Elite Women’s Education at the Turn of the Nineteenth Century with Dr. Lizzie Rogers

The historic house, in town or country, was a perfect resource to a girl, or woman, wanting to learn or gain an education during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Libraries, collections, art, wealth, and people were all at their fingertips: but of course, how accessible were these things to women? This period saw a shift, through the intellectual movement of the enlightenment, in ideas and knowledge practices that led some philosophers, like John Locke, to effectively argue that women were held back by poor education, not by their own state of being. What could a woman learn? What should or shouldn’t she know? Through the words of women from this period, and published writers such as Jane Austen (from whose Pride and Prejudice the title quotation is taken), Mary Wollstonecraft and Maria Edgeworth, this talk explores some of the ways ideas about women’s education in this period were reshaped, how elite women learned and accessed knowledge, and their experiences of doing so.
Play Video

Elite Women’s Education at the Turn of the Nineteenth Century with Dr. Lizzie Rogers

The historic house, in town or country, was a perfect resource to a girl, or woman, wanting to learn or gain an education during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Libraries, collections, art, wealth, and people were all at their fingertips: but of course, how accessible were these things to women? This period saw a shift, through the intellectual movement of the enlightenment, in ideas and knowledge practices that led some philosophers, like John Locke, to effectively argue that women were held back by poor education, not by their own state of being. What could a woman learn? What should or shouldn’t she know? Through the words of women from this period, and published writers such as Jane Austen (from whose Pride and Prejudice the title quotation is taken), Mary Wollstonecraft and Maria Edgeworth, this talk explores some of the ways ideas about women’s education in this period were reshaped, how elite women learned and accessed knowledge, and their experiences of doing so.
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