TM_pageTopDivider.gif

Watershed: Contemporary Landscape Photography

Jepson Center October 14, 2016-January 29, 2017

Watershed_ElectionEve4_697

Watershed explores the increasingly fraught relationship between humankind and the environment, giving photographic aid to a concern that has reached global significance in recent years. Since the 1970s, landscape photographers have embraced this new relationship with the natural world, marking a firm split from the pristine worldview touted by midcentury landscape photographers like Ansel Adams. Displaying works that evidence the undeniable human impact on the earth, these photographers reveal the landscape as an activated space—one that is imprinted by mankind and marked by social performance.

Watershed_Howl_697Uniting many works from Telfair’s permanent collection, this exhibition features approximately 40 works by 25 artists. This photographic survey is divided into several sections that explore trends in landscape photography since the 1970s: Objective, Atmosphere, Exposure, and Narrative.

“Objective” features works that present an indifferent aesthetic, achieved by straightforward depictions of America’s changing landscape pockmarked by industry and residential development. “Atmosphere” maintains the legacy of Ansel Adams through the presentation of the landscape as an overwhelming entity, albeit irreversibly affected by man’s presence. “Exposure” groups together artists who manipulate their photographic processes to create landscapes influenced by outside forces such as time and history. Finally, “Narrative” sets landscape as a stage for social interactions, often constructed to be actively interpreted by the viewer.

Sponsored in part by the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation.

 

Related Program

Jepson Center

Opening Lecture and Reception
Thursday, October 13, 6pm
Members free / non-members $5

Click here to register  »

Join Erin Dunn, Assistant Curator at Telfair Museums, for a lecture on Watershed, exploring how contemporary photography depicts the often contentious relationship between humans and the environments we inhabit. Reception to follow lecture.

 

William Eggleston (American, b. 1939)
Untitled (Road and farmland), 1976
Dye Transfer Print
22 x 28.5” (framed)
Collection of the Eggleston Artist Trust and Rose Gallery

Amy Stein (American, b. 1970)
Howl, 2007
Chromogenic print
24 x 30 inches
35 ¾ x 40 ¾ x 1 3/8 inches framed
Collection of the Nevada Museum of Art, The Altered Landscape, Carol Franc Buck Collection