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Photography Camp, Session 2 / Ages: 13-16

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While in this second session summer photo camp (ages 13-16) we didn’t hear the question “What is film?”

Not because they aren’t old enough to remember film- but because they already had a great amount of photography experience.

Two students who began in years past in our younger session continued in this older, more advanced group. There were also several students that have a significant amount of experience through other programs, such as the DeRenne Middle School Photography Program with Doug Padison.

This also was perhaps one of the most quiet teen groups I have ever encountered. I think the calmness was representational of the focused effort that has made this week’s camp as exciting as the first session.

In order to develop an understanding of film and exposure times the students use pinhole cameras, make photograms and develop their own images in a professional dark room. After reaching a full awareness of how a camera works, what film is, and the technical functions of a camera, the much-anticipated digital cameras are pulled out.

Bradley Lock and Key

These young teens had a chance to seek out some of the stars filming the CBGB movie on Broughton and Congress Streets, explore the multitude of photographic opportunities on River Street and use the store Folklorico as a photo studio. A highlight for this session was their visit to Bradley Lock and Key where students spoke with Mr. Bradley himself and took some wonderful photos of the shop as well as documenting the process of making a key.

These photo camps, sponsored by Kathy Levitt and Jack Leigh, began in 2006-making them some of Telfair Museums’ longest running summer educational programs. The camp, now taught by professional photographers Ann Curry and Charlie Ribbens, exposes students to advanced photography techniques in black and white as well as color film and digital photography.

Group Shot

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