TM_pageTopDivider.gif

National Trust for Historic Preservation Awards Telfair Museums a Preservation Grant from the Johanna Favrot Fund for Historic Preservation

For immediate release: June 13, 2011

Contact: Kristin Boylston
Director of Development and Communications
912-790-8890
Boylstonk@telfair.org

National Trust for Historic Preservation Awards Telfair Museums a Preservation Grant from the Johanna Favrot Fund for Historic Preservation

Savannah, GA- Telfair Museums proudly announces a $7,500 grant by the National Trust for Historic Preservation from the Johanna Favrot Fund for Historic Preservation. The grant will be used to aid the funding of the museums’ October symposium, Slavery and Freedom in Savannah.   This highly-competitive grant was awarded to only 11 organizations nationally this year.

“Without organizations like Telfair Museums, communities and towns all across America would have a diminished sense of place,” said Stephanie Meeks, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. “The National Trust for Historic Preservation is honored to provide a grant to Telfair Museums, which will use the funds to help preserve an important piece of our shared heritage.”

The 3-day symposium and subsequent book have important local, regional and national implications as a contemporary study for the examination of urban slavery and residential settlement in Savannah and the urban antebellum south. They are designed to expand the public’s understanding of American history by presenting the under-explored subject of slavery and freedom in an urban setting, specifically within the physical setting of the Owens-Thomas House and the preserved environment of Savannah’s National Historic Landmark District. The symposium is expected to generate valuable discussions and insight that will further guide on-site reinterpretation with the goal to contextualize the Owens-Thomas House within the social environment of its neighborhood and city in the 1820s and 1830s.

Led by national scholars Dr. Daina Ramey Berry, University of Texas at Austin, and Dr. Leslie M. Harris, Emory University, Slavery and Freedom in Savannah will kick off October 13, 2011, with a keynote lecture by Berry and Harris, at the Second African Baptist Church.   A day and a half of lectures about slavery and freedom in Savannah, from the Colonial era through Reconstruction, will follow on October 14 and 15 at Savannah Theater.

In 1994, the Johanna Favrot Fund for Historic Preservation was created from a generous grant from the Favrot family in honor of the 80th birthday of Texas preservationist Johanna Favrot. The fund fosters appreciation of America’s diverse cultural heritage and preserves and revitalizes the livability of the nation’s communities. Once a year, Favrot Fund grants ranging from $2,500 to $10,000 are awarded to nonprofit groups and public agencies. Grants must be matched at least dollar for dollar with public or private funds.

Additional funding for the Slavery and Freedom in Savannah symposium comes from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and the City of Savannah, with support from Live Oak Libraries and Second African Baptist Church.